Poisson Random Measures

[This is a companion to the previous post. They explore different aspects of the same problem which I have been thinking about from a research point of view. So that they can be read independently, there has inevitably been some overlap.]

As I explained in passing previously, Poisson Random Measures have come up in my current research project. Indeed, the context where they have appeared seems like a very good motivation for considering the construction and some properties of PRMs.

We begin not with a Poisson variable, but with a standard Erdos-Renyi random graph G(n,\frac{c}{n}). The local limit of a component in this random graph is given by a Galton-Watson branching process with Poisson(c) offspring distribution. Recall that a local limit is description of what the structure looks like near a given (or random) vertex. Since the vertices in G(n,p) are exchangeable, this rooting matters less. Anyway, the number of neighbours in the graph of our root is given by Bin(n-1,c/n). Suppose that the root v_0, has k neighbours. Then if we are just interested in determining the vertices in the component, we can ignore the possibility of further edges between these neighbours. So if we pick one of the neighbours of the root, say v_1, and count the number of neighbours of this vertex that we haven’t already considered, this is distributed as Bin(n-1-k,c/n), since we discount the root and the k neighbours of the root.

Then, as n grows large, Bin(n-1,c/n) converges in distribution to Po(c). Except on a very unlikely event whose probability we can control if we need, so does Bin(n-1-k,c/n). Indeed if we consider a set of K vertices which are already connected in some way, then the distribution of the number of neighbours of one of them which we haven’t already considered is still Po(c) in the limit.

Now we consider what happens if we declare the graph to be inhomogeneous. The simplest possible way to achieve this is to specify two types of vertices, say type A and type B. Then we specify the proportion of vertices of each type, and the probability that there is an edge between two vertices of given types. This is best given by a symmetric matrix. So for example, if we wanted a random bipartite graph, we could achieve this as described by setting all the diagonal entries of the matrix to be zero.

So does the local limit extend to this setting? Yes, unsurprisingly it does. To be concrete, let’s say that the proportion of types A and B are a and b respectively, and the probabilities of having edges between vertices of various types is given by P=(p_{ij}/n)_{i,j\in\{A,B\}}. So we can proceed exactly as before, only now we have to count how many type A neighbours and how many type B neighbours we see at all stages. We have to specify the type of our starting vertex. Suppose for now that it is type A. Then the number of type A neighbours is distributed as

\text{Bin}(an,p_{AA}/n)\stackrel{d}{\rightarrow}\text{Po}(ap_{AA}),

and similarly the limiting number of type B neighbours is \sim \text{Po}(bp_{AB}). Crucially, this is independent of the number of type A neighbours. The argument extends naturally to later generations, and the result is exactly a multitype Galton-Watson process as defined in the previous post.

My motivating model is the forest fire. Here, components get burned when they are large and reduced to singletons. It is therefore natural to talk about the ‘age’ of a vertex, that is, how long has elapsed since it was last burned. If we are interested in the forest fire process at some fixed time T>1, that is, once burning has started, then we can describe it as an inhomogeneous random graph, given that we know the ages of the vertices.

For, given two vertices with ages s and t, where WLOG s<t, we know that the older vertex could not have been joined to the other vertex between times T-t and T-s. Why? Well, if it had, then it too would have been burned at time T-s when the other vertex was burned. So the only possibility is that they might have been joined by an edge between times T-s and T. Since each edge arrives at rate 1/n, the probability that this happens is 1-e^{-s/n}\approx \frac{s}{n}. Indeed, in general the probability that two vertices of ages s and t are joined at time T is \frac{s\wedge t}{n}.

Again at fixed time T>1, the sequence of ages of the vertices converges weakly to some fixed distribution (which depends on T) as the number of vertices grows to infinity. We can then recover the graph structure by assigning ages according to this distribution, then growing the inhomogeneous random graph with the kernel as described. The question is: when we look for a local limit, how to do we describe the offspring distribution?

Note that in the limit, components will be burned continuously, so the distribution of possible ages is continuous (with an atom at T for those vertices which have never been burned). So if we try to calculate the distribution of the number of neighbours of age s, we are going to be doomed, because with probability 1 then is no vertex of age s anywhere!

The answer is that the offspring distribution is given by a Poisson Random Measure. You can think of this as a Poisson Point Process where the intensity is non-constant. For example, let us consider how many neighbours we expect to have with ages [s,s+ds]. Let us suppose the age of our root is t>s+ds for now. Assuming the distribution of ages, f(\cdot) is positive and continuous, the number of vertices with these ages in the system is roughly nf(s)ds, and so the number of neighbours with this property is roughly \text{Bin}(nf(s)ds,\frac{s}{n}). In particular, this does have a Poisson limit. We need to be careful about whether this Poisson limit is preserved by the approximation. In fact this is fine. Let’s assume WLOG that f is increasing at s. Then the number of age [s,s+ds] neighbours can be stochastically bounded between \text{Bin}(nf(s)ds,\frac{s}{n}) and \text{Bin}(nf(s+ds)ds,\frac{s+ds}{n}. As n grows, these converge in the distribution to two Poisson random variables, and then we can let ds go to zero. Note for full formalism, we may need to account for the large deviations event that the number of age s vertices in the system is noticeably different from its expectation. Whether this is necessary depends on whether the ages are assigning deterministically, or drawn IID-ly from f.

One important result to be drawn from this example is that the number of offspring from disjoint type sets, say [s_1,s_2], [t_1,t_2] are independent, for the same reason as in the two-type setting, namely that the underlying binomial variables are independent. We are, after all, testing different sets of vertices! The other is that the number of neighbours with ages in some range is Poisson. Notice that these two results are consistent. The number of neighbours with ages in the set [s_1,s_2]\cup [t_1,t_2] is given by the sum of two independent Poisson RVs, and hence is Poisson itself. The parameter of the sum RV is given by the sum of the original parameters.

These are essentially all the ingredients required for the definition of a Poisson Random Measure. Note that the set of offspring is a measure of the space of ages, or types. (Obviously, this isn’t a probability measure.) We take a general space E, with sigma algebra \mathcal{E}, and an underlying measure \mu on E. We want a distribution \nu for measures on E, such that for each Borel set A\in\mathcal{E}, \nu(A), which is random because \nu is, is distributed as \text{Po}(\mu(A)), and furthermore, for disjoint A,B\in\mathcal{E}, the random variables \nu(A),\nu(B) are independent.

If M=\mu(E)<\infty, then constructing such a random measure is not too hard using a thinning property. We know that \nu(E)\stackrel{d}{=}\text{Po}(M), and so if we sample a Poisson(M) number of RVs with distribution given by \frac{\mu(\cdot)}{M}, we get precisely the desired PRM. Proving this is the unique distribution with this property is best done using properties of the Laplace transform, which uniquely defines the law of a random measure in the same manner that the moment generating function defines the law of a random variable. Here the argument is a function, rather than a single variable for the MGF, reflecting the fact that the space of measures is a lot ‘bigger’ than the reals, where a random variable is supported. We can extend this construction for sigma-finite spaces, that is some countable union of finite spaces.

One nice result about Poisson random measures concerns the expectation of functions evaluated at such a random measure. Recall that some function f evaluated at the measure \sum \delta_{x_i} is given by \sum f(x_i). Then, subject to mild conditions on f, the expectation

\mathbb{E}\nu (f)=\mu(f).

Note that when f=1_A, this is precisely one of the definitions of the PRM. So by a monotone class result, it is not surprising that this holds more generally. Anyway, I’m currently trying to use results like these to get some control over what the structure of this branching processes look like, even when the type space is continuous as in the random graph with specified ages.

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One thought on “Poisson Random Measures

  1. Pingback: Isolated Vertices and the Second-Moment Method | Eventually Almost Everywhere

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