Skorohod embedding

Background

Suppose we are given a standard Brownian motion (B_t), and a stopping time T. Then, so long as T satisfies one of the regularity conditions under which the Optional Stopping Theorem applies, we know that \mathbb{E}[B_T]=0. (See here for a less formal introduction to OST.) Furthermore, since B_t^2-t is a martingale, \mathbb{E}[B_T^2]=\mathbb{E}[T], so if the latter is finite, so is the former.

Now, using the strong Markov property of Brownian motion, we can come up with a sequence of stopping times 0=T_0, T_1, T_2,\ldots such that the increments T_k-T_{k-1} are IID with the same distribution as T. Then 0,B_{T_1},B_{T_2},\ldots is a centered random walk. By taking T to be the hitting time of \{-1,+1\}, it is easy to see that we can embed simple random walk in a Brownian motion using this approach.

p1020956_compressedEmbedding simple random walk in Brownian motion.

The Skorohod embedding question asks: can all centered random walks be constructed in this fashion, by stopping Brownian motion at a sequence of stopping time? With the strong Markov property, it immediately reduces the question of whether all centered finite-variance distributions X can be expressed as B_T for some integrable stopping time T.

The answer to this question is yes, and much of what follows is drawn from, or at least prompted by Obloj’s survey paper which details the problem and rich history of the many approaches to its solution over the past seventy years.

Applications and related things

The relationship between random walks and Brownian motion is a rich one. Donsker’s invariance principle asserts that Brownian motion appears as the scaling limit of a random walk. Indeed, one can construct Brownian motion itself as the limit of a sequence of consistent random walks with normal increments on an increasingly dense set of times. Furthermore, random walks are martingales, and we know that continuous, local martingales can be expressed as a (stochastically) time-changed Brownian motion, from the Dubins-Schwarz theorem.

The Skorohod embedding theorem can be used to prove results about random walks with general distribution by proving the corresponding result for Brownian motion, and checking that the construction of the sequence of stopping times has the right properties to allow the result to be carried back to the original setting. It obviously also gives a coupling between a individual random walk and a Brownian motion which may be useful in some contexts, as well as a coupling between any pair of random walks. This is useful in proving results for random walks which are much easier for special cases of the distribution. For example, when the increments are Gaussian, or when there are combinatorial approaches to a problem about simple random walk. At the moment no aspect of this blog schedule is guaranteed, but I plan to talk about the law of the iterated logarithm shortly, whose proof is approachable in both of these settings, as well as for Brownian motion, and Skorohod embedding provides the route to the general proof.

At the end, we will briefly compare some other ways to couple a random walk and a Brownian motion.

Adding extra randomness

One thing we could do is sample a copy of X independently from the Brownian motion, then declare T= \tau_{X}:= \inf\{t\ge 0: B_t=X\}, the hitting time of (random value) X. But recall that unfortunately \tau_x has infinite expectation for all non-zero x, so this doesn’t fit the conditions required to use OST.

Skorohod’s original method is described in Section 3.1 of Obloj’s notes linked above. The method is roughly to pair up positive values taken by X appropriately with negative values taken by X in a clever way. If we have a positive value b and a negative value a, then \tau_{a,b}, the first hitting time of \mathbb{R}\backslash (a,b) is integrable. Then we choose one of these positive-negative pairs according to the projection of the distribution of X onto the pairings, and let T be the hitting time of this pair of values. The probability of hitting b conditional on hitting {a,b} is easy to compute (it’s \frac{-a}{b-a}) so we need to have chosen our pairs so that the ‘probability’ of hitting b (ie the density) comes out right. In particular, this method has to start from continuous distributions X, and treat atoms in the distribution of X separately.

The case where the distribution X is symmetric (that is X\stackrel{d}=-X) is particularly clear, as then the pairs should be (-x,x).

However, it feels like there is enough randomness in Brownian motion already, and subsequent authors showed that indeed it wasn’t necessary to introduce extra randomness to provide a solution.

One might ask whether it’s possible to generate the distribution on the set of pairs (as above) out of the Brownian motion itself, but independently from all the hitting times. It feels like it might be possible to make the distribution on the pairs measurable with respect to

\mathcal{F}_{0+} = \bigcap\limits_{t>0} \mathcal{F}_t,

the sigma-algebra of events determined by limiting behaviour as t\rightarrow 0 (which is independent of hitting times). But of course, unfortunately \mathcal{F}_{0+} has a zero-one law, so it’s not possible to embed non-trivial distributions there.

Dubins solution

The exemplar for solutions without extra randomness is due to Dubins, shortly after Skorohod’s original argument. The idea is to express the distribution X as the almost sure limit of a martingale. We first use the hitting time of a pair of points to ‘decide’ whether we will end up positive or negative, and then given this information look at the hitting time (after this first time) of two subsequent points to ‘decide’ which of four regions of the real interval we end up in.

I’m going to use different notation to Obloj, corresponding more closely with how I ended up thinking about this method. We let

a_+:= \mathbb{E}[X \,|\, X>0], \quad a_- := \mathbb{E}[X\,|\, X<0], (*)

and take T_1 = \tau_{\{a_-,a_+\}}. We need to check that

\mathbb{P}\left( B_{T_1}=a_+\right) = \mathbb{P}\left(X>0\right),

for this to have a chance of working. But we know that

\mathbb{P}\left( B_{T_1}=a_+\right) = \frac{a_+}{a_+-a_-},

and we can also attack the other side using (*) and the fact that \mathbb{E}[X]=0, using the law of total expectation:

0=\mathbb{E}[X]=\mathbb{E}[X\,|\, X>0] \mathbb{P}(X>0) + \mathbb{E}[X\,|\,X<0]\mathbb{P}(X<0) = a_+ \mathbb{P}(X>0) + a_- \left(1-\mathbb{P}(X>0) \right),

\Rightarrow\quad \mathbb{P}(X>0)=\frac{a_+}{a_+-a_-}.

Now we define

a_{++}=\mathbb{E}[X \,|\, X>a_+],\quad a_{+-}=\mathbb{E}[X\,|\, 0<X<a_+],

and similarly a_{-+},a_{--}. So then, conditional on B_{T_1}=a_+, we take

T_2:= \inf_{t\ge T_1}\left\{ B_t\not\in (a_{+-},a_{++})  \right\},

and similarly conditional on B_{T_1}=a_-. By an identical argument to the one we have just deployed, we have \mathbb{E}\left[B_{T_2} \,|\,\mathcal{F}_{T_1} \right] = B_{T_1} almost surely. So, although the a_{+-+} notation now starts to get very unwieldy, it’s clear we can keep going in this way to get a sequence of stopping times 0=T_0,T_1,T_2,\ldots where B_{T_n} determines which of the 2^n regions of the real line any limit \lim_{m\rightarrow\infty} B_{T_m} should lie in.

A bit of work is required to check that the almost sure limit T_n\rightarrow T is almost surely finite, but once we have this, it is clear that B_{T_n}\rightarrow B_T almost surely, and B_T has the distribution required.

Komlos, Major, Tusnady coupling

We want to know how close we can make this coupling between a centered random walk with variance 1, and a standard Brownian motion. Here, ‘close’ means uniformly close in probability. For large times, the typical difference between one of the stopping times 0,T_1,T_2,\ldots in the Skorohod embedding and its expectation (recall \mathbb{E}[T_k]=k) is \sqrt{n}. So, constructing the random walk S_0,S_1,S_2,\ldots from the Brownian motion via Skorohod embedding leads to

\left |S_k - B_k \right| = \omega(n^{1/4}),

for most values of k\le n. Strassen (1966) shows that the true scale of the maximum

\max_{k\le n} \left| S_k - B_k \right|

is slightly larger than this, with some extra powers of \log n and \log\log n as one would expect.

The Komlos-Major-Tusnady coupling is a way to do a lot better than this, in the setting where the distribution of the increments has a finite MGF near 0. Then, there exists a coupling of the random walk and the Brownian motion such that

\max_{k\le n}\left|S_k- B_k\right| = O(\log n).

That is, there exists C such that

\left[\max_{k\le n} \left |S_k-B_k\right| - C\log n\right] \vee 0

is a tight family of distributions, indeed with uniform exponential tail. To avoid digressing infinitely far from my original plan to discuss the proof of the law of iterated logarithm for general distributions, I’ll stop here. I found it hard to find much coverage of the KMT result apart from the challenging original paper, and many versions expressed in the language of empirical processes, which are similar to random walks in many ways relevant to convergence and this coupling, but not for Skorohod embedding. So, here is a link to some slides from a talk by Chatterjee which I found helpful in getting a sense of the history, and some of the modern approaches to this type of normal approximation problem.

Parking on a ring, linear hashing

I’ve spent most of my doctorate trying to analyse how adding destructive dynamics affects the behaviour of a particular random growth process, the classical random graph. In this post I’m going to talk about another random growth process, which is slightly less natural, but for which one can show some similar qualitative properties.

The model, and the additive coalescent

Consider m places arranged in a circle, and for consistency of analogy we think of these as parking spaces. Some number n of cars will arrive one at a time. Each car will arrive at a space chosen uniformly at random. If it is empty they will park in it, otherwise they will look clockwise until they find an empty space, and park there. For now we are only interested in growth, so we assume cars never leave. We are interested in the sizes of blocks of consecutively parked cars.

The reason to consider this slightly unnatural statement is its equivalence to the problem of hashing with linear probing, apparently a key topic in computer science, which I won’t pretend that I know anything about. In any case, it’s a nice model, and it seems reasonable that it would have a basis in more realistic search algorithms.

So, how does the sequence of sizes of blocks of consecutively parked cars grow? Well, given the sequence of block sizes, it is reasonably easy to convince yourself that the order of the blocks around the circle is uniformly random, and the number of empty spaces between adjacent blocks is also uniformly random.

Assume for now that there are at least three blocks. A block of size x can merge with a block of size y with the arrival of the next car only if the blocks are adjacent, with exactly one empty space between them. The chance of this is uniform among all pairs of blocks. Now suppose this is the case, and that the block of size y lies clockwise from the block of size x. Then they will merge precisely if the next car arrives at any of the x occupied spaces in that block, or at the empty space between the pair of blocks. This has probability \frac{x+1}{m}. There’s also the opposite ordering to consider, where the block of size x lies clockwise from the other. The total probability of this merge \{x,y\}\mapsto \{x+y+1\} is therefore proportional to (x+y+2).

So the process of block sizes looks a bit like the additive coalescent, at least for large blocks. This is in contrast to the random graph process, where the sequence of component sizes behaves exactly like a multiplicative coalescent, where blocks merge at a rate proportional to the product of their sizes.

Asymptotics

As in the random graph process, it’s interesting to ask roughly how large the largest block will be in such a configuration. Pittel [3] considers the case where the number of empty places \ell = m-n \approx \beta m, for some \beta\in (0,1).

A less interesting model would be to choose the positions of the n cars uniformly at random. But then the size of a block is roughly geometric with parameter \beta, and there are \Theta(m) blocks with high probability. Relatively straightforward calculations in extreme value theory suggest that the largest block is likely to have size on the order of \log m in this setting.

Of course, the actual model is slightly more complicated, because the size of a block is self-reinforcing, since larger blocks are more likely to grow than smaller blocks. However, we can still get somewhere with naïve estimates. Let’s label the places clockwise. Then in order for there to be a block starting at 0 and stretching beyond \alpha \log m, a necessary condition is that at least \alpha \log m cars arrive at those places. The number of cars which arrive at those places is binomial, since there are n cars, and each arrives at a place chosen uniformly, and independently of the other cars. So this event corresponds to

\mathrm{Bin}(n,\frac{\alpha \log m}{m}) \ge \alpha \log m.

Then, since n\approx (1-\beta)n, this event corresponds approximately to

\mathrm{Po}((1-\beta)\alpha \log m) \ge \alpha \log m.

The probability that a Poisson RV is at least a constant multiple larger than its mean decays exponentially with the mean, hence in this case the probability is asymptotically some negative power of m, depending on the value of \alpha. But there are O(m) possible places for such a block to start, so whether we can apply a union bound usefully or not depends on whether the power of m is strictly less than -1.

Since all of this depends on \alpha, it is reasonable that everything is fine, and the largest block does have size at least \alpha \log m when \alpha is small, and very unlikely when \alpha is large. This heuristic argument fits with Pittel’s theorem. Indeed, his result shows much stronger concentration: that the fluctuations of the size of the largest block are O(1).

Critical regime and empirical processes

The following is a paraphrase of the introduction and some methods from [2].

Obviously, once m=m cars have arrived, there’s no room for manoeuvre and definitely all the places are taken in one giant block. But it’s not obvious in general what scaling for the number of gaps will give rise to giant blocks of \Theta(m) cars.

As for the random graph, we can find a process similar to the exploration process of a (random) graph which encodes much of the information we care about. Let Y_k be the number of cars which arrive at place k. So the sum of the Y_ks will be n, the total number of cars. Now consider the process

C_0=0, \ldots, C_{k+1}=C_k + Y_{k+1}-1.

A block has the property that the number of arrivals within that set of places is equal to the number of places. So every time this *empirical process* C drops below its previous running minimum, this indicates the end of a block. To make this equivalence precise, we need to be a bit careful about where we start counting. It works exactly if we start at the beginning of a block. If not, it might introduce some unwanted divisions within the first block.

What we have is a process that looks roughly like a random walk that is constrained to pass through the point (m,n-m), which is equal to (m,-l). Even if we aren’t totally precise about how this is like a random walk, we would expect to see Brownian fluctuations after rescaling. Indeed, we might expect to see a Brownian bridge added to a deterministic linear function with negative gradient. But this is only meaningful if the random part is at least as large as the deterministic part, and since the fluctuations have order \sqrt{m}, if l is much larger than this, the rescaled empirical process is essentially deterministic, so we won’t see any macroscopic excursions above the minimum.

If l is substantially smaller than \sqrt{m}, then there is no real difference between (m,-l) and (m,0), and what we see is just a Brownian bridge. At this point, where we choose to start the process is actually important. If we were to start it at the minimum of the Brownian bridge instead, we would have seen a Brownian excursion, which corresponds to one block occupying (almost) all of the places.

Unsurprisingly, the story is completed by considering \ell=\Theta(\sqrt{m}), where the rescaled empirical process looks like a slanted Brownian bridge, that is Brownian motion conditioned to pass through $(1,-\frac{\ell}{\sqrt{m})$. There isn’t an obvious fix to the question of where to start the process, but it turns out that the correct way is now adding a Brownian excursion onto the deterministic linear function with gradient - \frac{\ell}{\sqrt{m}}. It’s now reasonable that the excursions above the minimum should macroscopic.

This scaling limit works dynamically as well, where the same Brownian excursion is used for different gradients of the deterministic line, corresponding to \ell moving through the critical window m-\Theta(\sqrt{m}). Finally, a direction to Bertoin’s recent paper [1] for the model with an additional destructive property. Analogous to the forest fire, blocks of cars are removed at a rate proportional to their size (as a result, naturally, of ‘Molotov cocktails’…). Similar effects of self-organised criticality are seen when the rate of bombs is scaled appropriately.

References

[1] – Bertoin – Burning cars in a parking lot (paper / slides)

[2] – Chassaing + Louchard – Phase transition for parking blocks, Brownian excursion and coalescence (arXiv)

[3] – Pittel – Linear probing: the probable largest search time grows logarithmically with the number of records