EGMO 2016 Paper II

Continuing from yesterday’s account of Paper I, this is a discussion of my thoughts about Paper II of EGMO 2016, happening at the moment in Busteni, Romania. This is not an attempt to describe official solutions, but rather to describe the thought process (well, a thought process) of someone tackling each question. I hope it might be interesting or useful, but for students, it will probably be more useful after at least some engagement with the problems. These are excellent problems, and reading any summary of solutions means you miss the chance to hunt for them yourself.

In actual news, you can follow the scoreboard as it is updated from Romania here. Well done to the UK team on an excellent performance, and hope everyone has enjoyed all aspects of the competition!

Question 4

Circles \omega_1,\omega_2 with the same radius meet at two points X_1,X_2. Circle \omega is externally tangent to \omega_1 at T_1, and internally tangent to \omega_2 at T_2. Prove that lines X_1T_1,X_2T_2 meet on \omega.

Thought 1: I’m not the biggest fan of geometry ever, but I thought this looked like a nice problem, because it’s only really about circles, so I figured it probably wouldn’t require anything too exotic.

Thought 2: I bet lots of people try inversion. But the equal radius condition means I’m probably happy with the circles as they are. I hope lots of people don’t try to place the diagram in some co-ordinate system, even if it possible to do it sensibly (eg by making \omega the reference circle).

Thought 3: The labelling of X_1,X_2 is unrelated to the rest of the indexing. So the intersection of X_1T_2,X_2T_1 should also lie on \omega, and possibly has some relationship (antipodal?) to the point I actually need to find out. But I can’t think of any reason why it’s easier to prove two points lie on a circle than just one, so let’s leave this as a thought rather than an idea.

Idea 1: I drew a terrible diagram on the back of a draft of my abstract, and for once, this was actually kind of helpful. Forget about radii being equal, one of them wasn’t even a circle. Anyway, while drawing in the later points, I was struggling to make it look convincingly like all the lengths which were supposed to be equal were in fact equal. So the idea was: almost all the segments in the diagram (once I’ve defined the circle centres O_{\omega_1} etc) have one of two lengths (the radii of \omega_1,\omega – red and green-ish in the diagram below), and with this in mind I can forget about the circles. We’ve got a rhombus, which is even better than a parallelogram, which is itself a really useful thing to have in a configuration. Another consequence of the proliferation of equal lengths is that almost all triangles are isosceles, and we know that similarity of isosceles triangles is particularly easy, because you only have to match up one angle.

Idea 2: How to prove it? We have to prove that two lines and a circle concur. This is where I actually need to stop and think for a moment: I could define the point where the lines meet and try to show it’s on the circle, or intersect one line with the circle, and show it’s on the other line. Idea 1 basically says I’m doing the problem using lengths, so I should choose the way that fits best with lengths.

20160414_093104

If I define the point P where X_2T_2 meets the circle (this was easier to draw in my diagram), then I know PO_\omega=T_2 O_\omega and so on. Then there were loads of isosceles triangles, and some of them were similar, which led to more parallel lines, and from this you could reverse the construction in the other direction to show that P also lay on the other line.

Question 5

Let k, n be integers such that k\ge 2,\, k\le n\le 2k-1. Place rectangular k x 1 or 1 x k tiles on an n x n chessboard in the natural way with no overlap until no further tile can be placed. Determine the minimum number of tiles that such an arrangement may contain.

Idea 1: It took me a while to parse the question. Minimum over what? I rephrased it in my head as: “to show the answer is eg n+5, I need to show that whenever you place n+4 tiles legally, you can’t add another. I also need to show that you can place n+5 such that you can’t add another.” This made life a lot easier.

Thought 1: What goes wrong if you take n=2k and beyond? Well, you can have two horizontal tiles on a given row. I’m not really sure how this affects the answer, but the fact that there is still space constraint for n<2k is something I should definitely use.

Diversion: I spent a while thinking that the answer was 4 and it was a very easy question. I spent a bit more time thinking that the answer was n, and it was a quite easy question, then realised that neither my construction nor my argument worked.

Thought 2: can I do the cases n=k,or 2k-1 or k+1? The answers were yes, unsure, and yes. The answer to k+1, which I now felt confident was actually four, was helpful, as it gave me a construction for k+2, …, 2k-1 that seemed good, even though it was clearly not optimal for 2k-1. Therefore, currently my potential answer has three regimes, which seemed unlikely, but this seemed a good moment to start trying to prove it was optimal. From now on, I’m assuming I have a configuration from which you can’t add another block.

20160414_100244

Idea 2: About this diagram, note that once I’ve filled out the top-left (k+1)x(k+1) sub-board in this way, there are still lots of ways to complete it, but I do have to have (n-k-1) horizontal and (n-k-1) vertical tiles roughly where I’ve put them. Why? Because I can’t ‘squeeze in’ a vertical tile underneath the blue bit, and I can’t squeeze in a horizontal tile to the right of the blue bit. Indeed, whenever I have a vertical block, there must be vertical blocks either to the left or to the right (*) (or possibly both if we’re near the middle). We need to make this precise, but before doing that, I looked back at where the vertical blocks were in the proposed optimum, and it turns out that all but (k-1) columns include a vertical block, and these (k-1) columns are next to each other.

This feels like a great idea for two reasons: 1) we’ve used the fact that n<2k at (*). 2) this feels very pigeonhole principle-ish. If we had fewer tiles, we’d probably have either at least k columns or least k rows without a vertical (or, respectively, horizontal) tile. Say k columns don’t include a vertical tile – so long as they are next to each other (which I think I know) we can probably include a horizontal tile somewhere in there.

So what’s left to do? Check the previous sentence actually works (maybe it’s full of horizontal tiles already?), and check the numerics of the pigeonhole bound. Also work out how the case n=2k-1 fits, but it seems like I’ve had some (/most) of the good ideas, so I stopped here.

Question 6

EGMO2016 Q6

I don’t actually want to say very much about this, because I didn’t finish off all the details. I want to talk briefly in quite vague terms about what to do if you think this problem looks scary. I thought it looked a bit scary because it looked similar to two number theoretic things I remember: 1) primes in arithmetic progressions. This is very technical in general, but I can remember how to do 3 mod 4 fairly easily, and 1 mod 4 with one extra idea; 2) if a square-free number can be written as a sum of two squares, this controls its factors modulo 4.

Vague Ideas: It seemed unlikely that this would involve copying a technical argument, so I thought about why I shouldn’t be scared. I think I shouldn’t be scared of the non-existence part. Often when I want to show there are no integer solutions to an equation, I consider showing there are no solutions modulo some base, and maybe this will be exactly what I do here. I’ll need to convert this statement about divisibility into an equation (hopefully) and check that n\equiv 3,4 modulo 7 doesn’t work.

For the existence of infinitely many solutions, maybe I’d use Chinese Remainder Theorem [1], or I’ll reduce it to something that I know has lots of solutions (eg Pythagoras), or maybe I can describe some explicit solutions?

Actual Idea 1: We’ve got n^2+m | n^4, but this is a very inefficient statement, since the RHS is a lot larger than the LHS, so to be useful I should subtract off a large multiple of the LHS. Difference of two squares is a good thing to try always, or I could do it manually. Either way, I get n^2+m | m^2 which is genuinely useful, given I know m=1,2, …, 2n, because the RHS is now comparable in size to the LHS, so I’ve narrowed it down from roughly n^2 possibilities to just three:

n^2+m=m^2,\quad 2(n^2+m)=m^2,\quad 3(n^2+m)=m^2. (*)

I’m going to stop now, because we’ve turned it into a completely different problem, which might be hard, but at least in principle this is solvable. I hope we aren’t actually scared of (*), since it looks like some problems we have solved before. I could handle one of these in a couple of lines, then struggled a bit more with the other pair. I dealt with one by recourse to some theory, and the final one by recourse to some theory after a lot of rearranging which I almost certainly got wrong, but I think I made an even number of mistakes rather than an odd number because I got the correct solution set modulo 7. Anyway, getting to (*) felt like the majority of the ideas, and certainly removed the fear factor of the Q6 label, so to fit the purpose of this discussion I’ll stop here.

[1] During one lunch in Lancaster, we were discussing why Chinese Remainder Theorem is called this. The claim was that an ancient Chinese general wanted to know the size of their army but it was too big to count, so had them arrange themselves into columns of various sizes, and counted the remainders. The general’s views on the efficiency of this algorithm remain lost in the mists of time.

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EGMO 2015

It’s been a while since I last wrote anything substantial. There have been some posts in the pipeline, but mainly I’ve been working hard on technical things that don’t translate very well into blog posts, and when I haven’t been working on those, have felt like doing non-maths.

Anyway, among other things which happened recently were the UK’s IMO selection camp in Cambridge during the last week of March, and the fourth European Girls’ Mathematical Olympiad in Belarus this past weekend. At the former, I was quite busy organising various things, and so gave a session based on some of my favourite problems about points and lines that I’ve used in the past. My hope was that with each problem in turn the students would actively invest time in thinking about whether the ideas each other were having seemed likely to be profitable. The aim was that being critical about your approach is a necessary skill once you start having lots of ideas for approaches.

This is hard to practise at school just by reading around, whether regarding competition material or generally. In the competition world, official solutions often contain unmotivated magic. This is reasonable, since they are supposed to be a minimal elementary demonstration of the problem’s validity. Motivation is a luxury which space and time sometimes doesn’t permit. And the solutions you find on, for example, Mathlinks often give the impression that the solvers know how to do 25,000 specific types of problem, and the sole task is to identify which type the latest one belongs to. Relating problems to ones you’ve seen before is important, but can hide, or at least dilute the actual ideas in some cases. Knowing that a specific inequality is a special case of a big machine allows you to claim a ‘solution’ but doesn’t help you identify the relevant ideas.

Later in the camp, a conversation arose concerning to what extent the younger staff found these elementary methods and problems easier now that they had experienced various levels of higher education in mathematics than when they were at school. It’s a complicated question, and I don’t think there’s a simple answer. I think the students might suspect that doing a university degree teaches you ‘advanced techniques’ which immediately simplify some of these problems. In rare examples this can be the case, but the majority of the time, I personally feel the only advantage I have is perhaps better instincts for whether something is or isn’t going to work.

Probably a good test would be Euclidean geometry. Adult olympiad staff typically come in two flavours: those who used to be good at geometry and feel out of practice; and those who weren’t good at geometry and certainly had no inclination to remedy this after they left school. I’m probably closer to the first category and I definitely feel out of practice, but also have minimal inclination to remedy this. Nonetheless, on the rare occasions I try these questions (and it’s not going to be for 4.5 hours at this stage…) my progress rate is probably comparable to when I was in sixth form. I’ve no idea how to turn this into a more concrete assessment, but there must be something about doing abstract maths all the time that prevents you forgetting how to do this, so presumably it should be at least as helpful in the types of problem with non-zero overlap with things I actually do. I won’t discuss geometry in the rest of this post, but I did also enjoy the geometry questions – it’s simply that I feel anything I have to say about them would be less useful than saying nothing.

In any case, I enjoyed trying the problems from Belarus in between bouts of typing, and thought I would write some brief comments about how I decided whether my ideas were good or not. To achieve this, I’ve looked at my rough, and will tell you the ideas which didn’t work, as well as some of the ones which did. I’ve paraphrased the statements slightly to avoid having too many LaTeX tags.

WARNING: what follows will spoil questions {2,4,5} if you haven’t already looked at them, but would like to.

Question 2 – A domino is a 2 × 1 or 1 × 2 tile. Determine in how many ways exactly n^2 dominoes can be placed without overlapping on a 2n × 2n chessboard so that every 2 × 2 square contains at least two uncovered unit squares which lie in the same row or column.

The wording of the question prompted me to consider splitting the board naturally into n^2 2 x 2 squares. I then thought about this ‘at least’ in the question, and concluded that for these 2 x 2 squares, it should be ‘exactly’.

I tried doing an unusual colouring, when I coloured half the black squares green, and half blue and tried to show that either only greens or only blues were covered, but this was clearly not true, or fixable. I then tried to do something similar for the other set of 2 x 2 squares (those whose vertices have (odd, odd) coordinates). Roughly speaking, if too few of the outer cells on the original board are covered, you can’t achieve the bounds on these odd inner squares. But this didn’t really give any useful information.

However, it did get me thinking about how what happens in the far top-left affects the rest of the board, and from there most of the ideas came quickly. I described a 2 x 2 square as N, E, S, W depending on which ‘half’ of the square was covered. Then if a square is N, all the squares directly above it must be also be N (*).

I then made two mistakes, and if we’re looking for reasons where experience is helpful, it was probably here, as I spotted them fairly quickly, rather than wasting ages and ages.

First, I decided that either all squares were {N,E} or all were {S,W} which seemed plausible when I had been focusing on the top-left. This gave an answer of 2 \binom{2n}{n}, but after a bit more thought is clearly not symmetric enough.

Second, I thought condition (*) might be the only constraint, along with similar ones for E, S, W naturally too. I tried to count these using a similar method of enumerating lines between these regions, and I realised I didn’t know how to do these sensibly, for example if it looked like this:

EGMO15 Q2 diagram (3)

This led to another bit of meta-maths that I probably wouldn’t have considered if I was 16. Namely, that the idea of counting these monotone lines across the 2n x 2n grid was too nice not to be useful. Also, if I couldn’t see a way to adapt it for this more complicated setup, my setup was probably wrong. This thought was useful, and then by thinking about the interface between {N,E} and {S,W}, then the other way round, it made sense that the configuration could be parameterised by two monotone lines between different pairs of corners, giving an answer of \binom{2n}{n}^2.

So, if it’s possible to give a reason why I could do this, it’s probably because I had an arsenal of ways to check an answer for plausibility, which saved wasting time on something wrong, and also because I trusted that the answer would be nice, which saved wasting time on something which was also wrong, and would probably have been very complicated to resolve.

Question 4 – Determine whether there exists an infinite sequence a_1,a_2,\ldots of positive integers satisfying a_{n+2}=a_{n+1}+\sqrt{a_{n+1}+a_n}.

So, my first reaction was ‘no way’. Why? Because everything’s determined by the first two terms, and I couldn’t think of any reason why a cool choice of the first two terms would force all of the sums a_{n+1}+a_n to be perfect squares. It seemed just about possible that we could arbitrarily large finite sequences with this property. (Though this also turns out to be impossible.)

I imagine many contestants might have felt similarly and spent a while playing round with quadratic residues to get a sense for exactly how hard it is to make this work for the initial terms. But I was suspicious of the form of the recurrence. We know that if it had been defined linearly, then the terms would grow exponentially, but it’s natural to ask roughly how fast they grow in this example, even relaxing the restriction that the terms be integers.

The first observation was that they are indeed (strictly) growing! But how fast? Are there actually enough squares that every a_{n+1}+a_n can be a different one? Note that the squares themselves satisfy a similar recurrence relation (N+1)^2 = N^2 + 2\sqrt{N^2} + 1 > N^2 + \sqrt{ N^2 + N^2}. So this seemed like a very good idea, and my instinct was that this should work, and I felt glad that I hadn’t pursued the quadratic residues approach.

From here we were basically home. I asked whether the sequence grows faster than the sequence (\frac{n^2}{2}), and the answer was no as

a_{n+2}\le a_{n+1}+ \sqrt{2 a_{n+1}} \le (\sqrt{a_{n=1}} + \frac{1}{\sqrt 2})^2,

so if (after translating indices) a_n = \frac{x^2}{2}, we have a_{n+1}\le \frac{(x+1)^2}{2}. This is clearly a problem or at best a very tight constraint if all the \{a_n+a_{n+1}\} have to be perfect squares, so even though we aren’t completely finished, I am confident I can be in one or two lines, with a bit of care. Fiddling with small values of n looked like it would work, or showing that looking at a large enough initial subsequence that the effect of the first two terms dissipated, we must by the pigeonhole principle have a_{n+2}+a_{n+1}=(k+1)^2,\, a_{n+1}+a_n=k^2, which is enough by a parity argument, using the original statement.

This final bit looks and feels a bit messy, but by this stage it really is just finding any argument to justify why a sequence which grows at most as fast as n^2 can’t actually be n^2 eventually.

Probably the reason I did this quickly was because I trusted my instinct for ‘no’, and also because there seemed a quick way to qualify *roughly* how this sequence grew. Sensibly approximating things, and deciding whether it’s appropriate to approximate them is definitely something I feel I’ve got better at during my PhD, so I guess this was helpful, then just try and throw back the important condition that the elements were integers at the very end.

Question 5 – Anastasia partitions the integers [1,2m] into pairs. Boris tries to choose one integer from each pair so that the sum is n. Given n and m, prove Anastasia can select pairs so that Boris can’t succeed.

So I wasted some thought time by imagining that n was fixed and trying to come up with ideas for the choice of pairs which might avoid n. It struck me that there was no reason why a a typical (uniformly chosen) pairing should avoid any particular n unless this value was particularly big or small.

How big or how small? Well Boris can always choose the bigger element of a pair, so the way to make the minimum maximum is to pair as (1,2), (3,4), … , (2m-1,2m). Conveniently, this also achieves the maximum minimum. These can be calculated as m^2,m(m+1) respectively. Suddenly this seems great, because we’ve actually solved the problem for a huge range of n, ie everything not within between these extrema.

The key step here was to start considering special pairings, chosen to give a reduced set of possible sums. Once we’ve had this idea, it makes sense to consider other different special pairings. The reason we got a small set of possible sums is that there’s lots of overlap. We can achieve lots of overlap by looking at the difference between elements in a pair, and making as many of these the same as possible. For, consider pairs (a,a+d), (b,b+d). Then it’s the same to take a and b+d as to take a+d and b, so we get the same sums in lots of different ways.

The other way to have as many differences the same as possible is to go for (1,m+1), (2,m+2), … , (m,2m). Conveniently, we can parameterise the sums now because at each choice, we decide whether to add an extra m or not, so the sum must be 1+2+…+m, plus some multiple of m. So we can defeat Boris, except when n is \binom{m}{2}+km.

This is a good point to stop because what followed was basically book-keeping. We only have to consider a couple of specific cases when m is odd, and one when m is even, that happen not to fall into either of the categories we can now deal with. It wasn’t too hard to corrupt the examples we already have to deal with these.

The key here was responding to initial failure by trying to find any control at all over n. Perhaps given enough time I would have started trying special pairings? Equally, I might have tried small examples, which would not really have been hugely helpful for this question. In any case, trying to eliminate very small or very large n luckily worked well, as a) I didn’t need to use the word ‘very’ twice in the end; and b) the idea of looking at choices of pairings to minimise the number of sums quickly gave other useful deductions.

I also really enjoyed Question 3, though was suspicious that I’d used a bound a great deal weaker than one in the question. Along the way, I was trying something confusing and not especially useful that led me into some interesting theory about Latin squares, which I might write something about later in the week.

 

Rhombus Tilings and a Nice Bijection

I want to write a short post giving an example of what seems to me to be a rather nice proof without words. Like all the best proofs without words, they require some words to set everything up, and then even the proof itself is enhanced with a few words.

The goal is a bijection between two combinatorial objects. The first is the family of rhombus tilings. Perhaps the easiest way to define these is to give an example.

DSC_2215 - Copy

As you can see, we have tiled a hexagon with rhombi. The tiles are allowed to be in any of the three possible orientations. It matters that the angles of the hexagon are 120, as we want it to be possible to squeeze rhombi into a corner in two different ways (ie either a single tile or two tiles together), and thus the rhombi should also have angles 120 and 60. The hexagon does not have to be equilateral, as in this example, but obviously all the side lengths should be an integer multiple of the side length of the rhombus, which without loss of generality we may take to be 1.

The other combinatorial object is the class of plane partitions. We again give an example:

4 3 3 2 1
4 2 2 2
3 2 2 1
2 1 1

Notice that all the rows and columns are weakly decreasing. One observation worth making is that the diagonals gives a family of so-called interlaced partitions. In any case, we want to establish this bijection. First I show the idea, that is the proof without words bit. Then I’ll clarify exactly how to make the bijection work.

The first step is to colour a rhombus tiling with a different colour for each orientation, as shown.

DSC_2216 - Copy

The next step is the proof without words bit. We now look at the diagram as if we were looking into a stack of cubes arranged in the positive orthant of R^3. The colouring makes this much more visually arresting. Black rhombi correspond to the (visible) top sides of cubes, while blue and red faces point out in the x and y directions respectively. The key observation is that a rhombus tiling means we can see at least one face of every cube. Otherwise we would need some smaller rhombi to account for the way that some cubes will be partially hidden between taller but closer piles. So if make a note of the heights of all the piles, we should get a plane partition.

After reordering our definition of plane partition, so it is weakly increasing left-right and down-up, corresponding to the x and y axes drawn on the above diagram, the given rhombus tiling should give the following plane partition:

1 2 3
0 1 3
0 0 2

The only thing we need to sort out is precisely how the dimensions of the hexagon restrict the choice of plane partition. Note that we could keep the heights exactly the same but get a different tiling by adding an extra row of red oriented rhombi above the top-left part, and an extra row of blue oriented rhombi above the top-right part. The point is that this would give us a bigger hexagon.

The first observation is that the dimensions of the plane partition correspond to two of the side lengths of the hexagon, indeed the bottom two sides. The third length of the hexagon corresponds to the maximum possible height (ie z component) of the region we are looking at. This is therefore an upper bound on the heights of the stacks.

So we can conclude our bijective argument. There is a bijection between rhombus tilings of the hexagon with side lengths X, Y, Z and plane partitions with dimension X x Y, (where entries are allowed to be zero) where the largest element (which is by definition also the top-left element, or top-right in our re-definition) is at most Z.

It seems there are plenty of interesting questions to be asked about both deterministic and random tilings and plane partitions, based on talks in Marseille. For now though, I feel ill-qualified even to read about such things, so will leave it at that for today.