Kernels of critical graph components

This post is motivated by G(N,p), the classical Erdos-Renyi random graph, specifically its critical window, when p=p(N)=\frac{1}{N}(1+\lambda N^{-1/3}).

We start with the following observation, which makes no restriction on p. Suppose a component of G(N,p) is a tree. Then, the graph geometry of this component is that of a uniform random tree on the appropriate number of vertices. This is deliberately informal. To be formal, we’d have to say “condition on a particular subset of vertices forming a tree-component” and so on. But the formality is broadly irrelevant, because at the level of metric scaling limits, if we want to describe the structure of a tree component, it doesn’t matter whether it has \log N or \frac{1}{7}N vertices, because in both cases the tree structure is uniform. The only thing that changes is the scaling factor.

In general, when V vertices form a connected component of a graph with E edges, we define the excess to be E-V+1. So the excess is non-negative, and is zero precisely when the component is a tree. I’m reluctant to say that the excess counts the number of cycles in the component, but certainly it quantifies the amount of cyclic structure present. We will sometimes, in a mild abuse of notation, talk about excess edges. But note that for a connected component with positive excess, there is a priori no way to select which edges would be the excess edges. In a graph process, or when there is some underlying exploration of the component, there sometimes might be a canonical way to classify the excess edges, though it’s worth remarking that the risk of size-biasing errors is always extremely high in this sort of situation.

Returning to the random graph process, as so often there are big changes around criticality. In the subcritical regime, the components are small, and most of them, even the largest with high probability, are trees. In the supercritical regime, the giant component has excess \Theta(N), which is qualitatively very different.

It feels like every talk I’ve ever given has begun with an exposition of Aldous’s seminal paper [Al97] giving a distributional scaling limit of the sizes of critical components in the critical window, and a relation between the process on this time-scale and the multiplicative coalescent. And it remains relevant here, because the breadth-first exploration process can also be used to track the number of excess edges.

In a breadth-first exploration, we have a stack of vertices we are waiting to explore. We pick one and look its neighbours restricted to the rest of the graph, that is without the vertices we have already fully explored, and also without the other vertices in the stack. That’s the easiest way to handle the total component size. But we can simultaneously track how many times we would have joined to a neighbour within the stack, which leads to an excess edge, and Aldous derives a joint distributional scaling limit for the sizes of the critical components and their excesses. (Note that in this case, there is a canonical notion of excess edge, but it depends not just on the graph structure, but also on the extra randomness of the ordering within the breadth-first search.)

Roughly speaking, we consider the reflected exploration process, and its scaling limit, which is a reflected parabolically-drifting Brownian motion (though the details of this are not important at this level of exposition, except that it’s a well-behaved non-negative process that hits zero often). The component sizes are given by the widths of the excursions above zero, scaled up in a factor N^{1/3}. Then conditional on the shape of the excursion, the excess is Poisson with parameter the area under the excursion, with no rescaling. That is, a critical component has \Theta(1) excess.

So, with Aldous’s result in the background, when we ask about the metric structure of these critical components, we are really asking: “what does a uniformly-chosen connected component with fixed excess look like when the number of vertices grows?”

I’ll try to keep notation light, but let’s say T(n,k) is a uniform choice from connected graphs on n vertices with excess k.

[Note, the separation of N and n is deliberate, because in the critical window, the connected components have size n = \Theta(N^{2/3}), so I want to distinguish the two problems.]

In this post, we will mainly address the question: “what does the cycle structure of T(n,k) look like for large n?” When k=0, we have a uniform tree, and the convergence of this to the Brownian CRT is now well-known [CRT2, LeGall]. We hope for results with a similar flavour for positive excess k.

2-cores and kernels

First, we have to give a precise statement of what it means to study just the cycle structure of a connected component. From now on I will assume we are always working with a connected graph.

There are several equivalent definitions of the 2-core C(G) of a graph G:

  • When the excess is positive, there are some cycles. The 2-core is the union of all edges which form part of some cycle, and any edges which lie on a path between two edges which both form part of some cycle.
  • C(G) is the maximal induced subgraph where all degrees are at least two.
  • If you remove all the leaves from the graph, then all the leaves from the remaining graph, and continue, the 2-core is the state you arrive at where there are no leaves.

It’s very helpful to think of the overall structure of the graph as consisting of the 2-core, with pendant trees ‘hanging off’ the 2-core. That is, we can view every vertex of the 2-core as the root of a (possibly size 1) tree. This is particular clear if we remove all the edges of the 2-core from the graph. What remains is a forest, with one tree for each vertex of the 2-core.

In general, the k-core is the maximal induced subgraph where all degrees are at least k. The core is generally taken to be something rather different. For this post (and any immediate sequels) I will never refer to the k-core for k>2, and certainly not to the traditional core. So I write ‘core’ for ‘2-core’.

As you can see in the diagram, the core consists of lots of paths, and topologically, the lengths of these paths are redundant. So we will often consider instead the kernel, K(G), which is constructed by taking the core and contracting all the paths between vertices of degree greater than 2. The resulting graph has minimal degree at least three. So far we’ve made no comment about the simplicity of the original graphs, but certainly the kernel need not be simple. It will regularly have loops and multiple edges. The kernel of the graph and core in the previous diagram is therefore this:

Kernels of critical components

To recap, we can deconstruct a connected graph as follows. It has a kernel, and each edge of the kernel is a path length of some length in the core. The rest of the graph consists of trees hanging off from the core vertices.

For now, we ask about the distribution of the kernel of a T(n,K). You might notice that the case k=1 is slightly awkward, as when the core consists of a single cycle, it’s somewhat ambiguous how to define the kernel. Everything we do is easily fixable for k=1, but rather than carry separate cases, we handle the case k\ge 2.

We first observe that fixing k doesn’t confirm the number of vertices or edges in the kernel. For example, both of the following pictures could correspond to k=3:

However, with high probability the kernel is 3-regular, which suddenly makes the previous post relevant. As I said earlier, it can introduce size-biasing errors to add the excess edges one-at-a-time, but these should be constant factor errors, not scaling errors. So imagine the core of a large graph with excess k=2. For the sake of argument, assume the kernel has the dumbbell / handcuffs shape. Now add an extra edge somewhere. It’s asymptotically very unlikely that this is incident to one of the two vertices with degree three in the core. Note it would need to be incident to both to generate the right-hand picture above. Instead, the core will gain two new vertices of degree three.

Roughly equivalently, once the size of the core is fixed (and large) we have to make a uniform choice from connected graphs of this size where almost every vertex has degree 2, and \Theta(1) of the rest have degree 3 or higher. But the sum of the degrees is fixed, because the excess is fixed. If there are n vertices in the core, then there are \Theta(n) more graphs where all the vertices have degree 2 or 3, than graphs where a vertex has degree at least 4. Let’s state this formally.

Proposition: The kernel of a uniform graph with n vertices and excess k\ge 2 is, with high probability as n\rightarrow\infty, 3-regular.

This proved rather more formally as part of Theorem 7 of [JKLP], essentially as a corollary after some very comprehensive generating function setup; and in [LPW] with a more direct computation.

In the previous post, we introduced the configuration model as a method for constructing regular graphs (or any graphs with fixed degree sequence). We observe that, conditional on the event that the resulting graph is simple, it is in fact uniformly-distributed among simple graphs. When the graph is allowed to be a multigraph, this is no longer true. However, in many circumstances, as remarked in (1.1) of [JKLP], for most applications the configuration model measure on multigraphs is the most natural.

Given a 3-regular labelled multigraph H with 2(k-1) vertices and 3(k-1) edges, and K a uniform choice from the configuration model with these parameters, we have

\mathbb{P}\left( K \equiv H \right) \propto \left(2^{t(H)} \prod_{e\in E(H)} \mathrm{mult}(e)! \right)^{-1},

where t(H) is the number of loops in H, and mult(e) the multiplicity of an edge e. This might seem initially counter-intuitive, because it looks we are biasing against graphs with multiple edges, when perhaps our intuition is that because there are more ways to form a set of multiple edges we should bias in favour of it.

I think it’s most helpful to look at a diagram of a multigraph as shown, and ask how to assign stubs to edges. At a vertex with degree three, all stub assignments are different, that is 3!=6 possibilities. At the multiple edge, however, we care which stubs match with which stubs, but we don’t care about the order within the multi-edge. Alternatively, there are three choices of how to divide each vertex’s stubs into (2 for the multi-edge, 1 for the rest), and then two choices for how to match up the multi-edge stubs, ie 18 in total = 36/2, and a discount factor of 2.

We mention this because in fact K(T(n,k)) converges in distribution to this uniform configuration model. Once you know that K(T(n,k)) is with high probability 3-regular, then again it’s probably easiest to think about the core, indeed you might as well condition on its total size and number of degree 3 vertices. It’s then not hard to convince yourself that a uniform choice induces a uniform choice of kernel. Again, let’s state that as a proposition.

Proposition: For any H a 3-regular labelled multigraph H with 2(k-1) vertices and 3(k-1) edges as before,

\lim_{n\rightarrow\infty}\mathbb{P}\left( K(T(n,k)) \equiv H \right) \propto \left(2^{t(H)} \prod_{e\in E(H)} \mathrm{mult}(e)! \right)^{-1}.

As we said before, the kernel describes the topology of the core. To reconstruct the graph, we need to know the lengths in the core, and then how to glue pendant trees onto the core. But this final stage depends on k only through the total length of paths in the core. Given that information, it’s a combinatorial problem, and while I’m not claiming it’s easy, it’s essentially the same as for the case with k=1, and is worth treating separately.

It is worth clarifying a couple of things first though. Even the outline of methods above relies on the fact that the size of the core diverges as n grows. Again, the heuristic is that up to size-biasing errors, T(n,k) looks like a uniform tree with some uniformly-chosen extra edges. But distances in T(n,k) scale like n^{1/2} (and thus in critical components of G(N,p) scale like N^{1/3}). And the core will be roughly the set of edges on paths between the uniformly-chosen pairs of vertices, and so will also have length \Theta(n^{1/2}).

Once you have conditioned on the kernel structure, and the (large) number of internal vertices on paths in the core (ie the length of the core), it is natural that the assignment of the degree-2 vertices to core paths / kernel edges is uniform. A consequence of this is that if you record (Y_1,\ldots,Y_m) the lengths of paths in the core, where m=3(k-1), then

\frac{(Y_1,\ldots,Y_m)}{\sum Y_i} \stackrel{d}\rightarrow \mathrm{Dirichlet}(1,1,\ldots,1).

This is stated formally as Corollary 7 b) of [ABG09]. It’s worth noting that this confirms that the lengths of core paths are bounded in probability away from zero after the appropriate rescaling. In seeking a metric scaling limit, this is convenient as it means there’s so danger that two of the degree-3 vertices end up in ‘the same place’ in the scaling limit object.

To recap, the only missing ingredients now to give a complete limiting metric description of T(n,k) are 1) a distributional limit of the total core length; 2) some appropriate description of set of pendant trees conditional on the size of the pendant forest. [ABG09] show the first of these. As remarked before, all the content of the second of these is encoded in the unicyclic k=1 case, which I have written about before, albeit slightly sketchily, here. (Note that in that post we get around size-biasing by counting a slightly different object, namely unicyclic graphs with an identified cyclic edge.)

However, [ABG09] also propose an alternative construction, which you can think of as glueing CRTs directly onto the stubs of the kernel (with the same distribution as before). The proof that this construction works isn’t as painful as one might fear, and allows a lot of the other metric distributional results to be read off as corollaries.

References

[ABG09] – Addario-Berry, Broutin, Goldschmidt – Critical random graphs: limiting constructions and distributional properties

[CRT2] – Aldous – The continuum random tree: II

[Al97] – Aldous – Brownian excursions, critical random graphs and the multiplicative coalescent

[JKLP] – Janson, Knuth, Luczak, Pittel – The birth of the giant component

[LeGall] – Le Gall – Random trees and applications

[LPW] – Luczak, Pittel, Wierman – The structure of a random graph at the point of the phase transition

 

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Generating uniform trees

A long time ago, I wrote quite a few a things about uniform trees. That is, a uniform choice from the n^{n-2} unrooted trees with vertex set [n]. This enumeration, normally called Cayley’s formula, has several elegant arguments, including the classical Prufer bijection. But making a uniform choice from a large set is awkward, and so we seek more probabilistic methods to sample such a tree, which might also give insight into the structure of a ‘typical’ uniform tree.

In another historic post, I talked about the Aldous-Broder algorithm. Here’s a quick summary. We run a random walk on the complete graph K_n started from a uniformly-chosen vertex. Every time we arrive at a vertex we haven’t visited before, we record the edge just traversed. Eventually we have visited all n vertices, so have recorded n-1 edges. It’s easy enough to convince yourself that these n-1 edges form a tree (how could there be a cycle?) and a bit more complicated to decide that the distribution of this tree is uniform.

It’s worth noting that this algorithm works to construct a uniform spanning tree on any connected base graph.

This post is about a few alternative constructions and interpretations of the uniform random tree. The first construction uses a Galton-Watson process. We take a Galton-Watson process where the offspring distribution is Poisson(1), and condition that the total population size is n. The resulting random tree has a root but no labels, however if we assign labels in [n] uniformly at random, the resulting rooted tree has the uniform distribution among rooted trees on [n].

Proof

This is all about moving from ordered trees to non-ordered trees. That is, when setting up a Galton-Watson tree, we distinguish between the following two trees, drawn extremely roughly in Paint:

That is, it matters which of the first-generation vertices have three children. Anyway, for such a (rooted) ordered tree T with n vertices, the probability that the Galton-Watson process ends up equal to T is

\mathbb{P}(GW = T) = \prod_{v\in T} \frac{e^{-1}}{C(v)!} = e^{-n} \prod_{v\in T}\frac{1}{C(v)!},

where C(v) is the number of children of a vertex v\in T. Then, since \mathbb{P}( |GW|=n ) is a function of n, we find

\mathbb{P}(GW=T \,\big|\, |GW|=n) = f(n)\prod_{v\in T} \frac{1}{C(v)!},

where f(n) is a function of n alone (ie depends on T only through its size n).

But given an unordered rooted tree t, labelled by [n], there are \prod_{v \in t} C(v)! ordered trees associated to t in the natural way. Furthermore, if we take the Poisson Galton-Watson tree conditioned to have total population size n, and label uniformly at random with [n], we obtain any one of these ordered trees with probability \frac{f(n)}{n!} \prod_{v\in t} \frac{1}{C(v)!}. So the probability that we have t after we forget about the ordering is \frac{f(n)}{n!}, which is a function of n alone, and so the distribution is uniform among the set of rooted unordered trees labelled by [n], exactly as required.

Heuristic for Poisson offspring distribution

In this proof, the fact that \mathbb{P}(C(v)=k)\propto \frac{1}{k!} exactly balances the number of orderings of the k children explains why Poisson(1) works out. Indeed, you can see in the proof that Poisson(c) works equally well, though when c\ne 1, the event we are conditioning on (namely that the total population size is n) has probability decaying exponentially in n, whereas for c=1, the branching process is critical, and the probability decays polynomially.

We can provide independent motivation though, from the Aldous-Broder construction. Both the conditioned Galton-Watson construction and the A-B algorithm supply the tree with a root, so we’ll keep that, and look at the distribution of the degree of the root as constructed by A-B. Let \rho=v_1,v_2,v_3,\ldots be the vertices [n], ordered by their discovery during the construction. Then \rho is definitely connected by an edge to v_2, but thereafter it follows by an elementary check that the probability \rho is connected to v_m is \frac{1}{n-1}, independently across all m. In other words, the distribution of the degree of \rho in the tree as constructed by A-B is

1+ \mathrm{Bin}\left(n-2,\frac{1}{n-1}\right) \approx 1+\mathrm{Poisson}(1).

Now, in the Galton-Watson process, conditioning the tree to have fixed, large size changes the offspring distribution of the root. Conveniently though, in a limiting sense it’s the same change as conditioning the tree to have size at least n. Since these events are monotone in n, it’s possible to take a limit of the conditioning events, and interpret the result as the Galton-Watson tree conditioned to survive. It’s a beautiful result that this interpretation can be formalised as a local limit. The limiting spine decomposition consists of an infinite spine, where the offspring distribution is a size-biased version of the original offspring distribution (and so in particular, always has at least one child) and where non-spine vertices have the original distribution.

In particular, the number of the offspring of the root is size-biased, and it is well-known and not hard to check that size-biasing Poisson(c) gives 1+Poisson(c) ! So in fact we have, in an appropriate limiting sense in both objects, a match between the degree distribution of the root in the uniform tree, and in the conditioned Galton-Watson tree.

This isn’t supposed to justify why a conditioned Galton-Watson tree is relevant a priori (especially the unconditional independence of degrees), but it does explain why Poisson offspring distributions are relevant.

Construction via G(N,p) and the random cluster model

The main reason uniform trees were important to my thesis was their appearance in the Erdos-Renyi random graph G(N,p). The probability that vertices {1, …, n} form a tree component in G(N,p) with some particular structure is

p^{n-1} (1-p)^{\binom{n}{2}-(n-1)} \times (1-p)^{n(N-m)}.

Here, the first two terms give the probability that the graph structure on {1, …, n} is correct, and the the final term gives the probability of the (independent) event that these vertices are not connected to anything else in the graph. In particular, this has no dependence on the tree structure chosen on [n] (for example, whether it should be a path or a star – both examples of trees). So the conditional distribution is uniform among all trees.

If we work in some limiting regime, where pn\rightarrow 0 (for example if n is fixed and p=\frac{1}{N}\rightarrow 0), then we can get away asymptotically with less strong conditioning. Suppose we condition instead just that [n] form a component. Now, there are more ways to form a connected graph with one cycle on [n] than there are trees on [n], but the former all require an extra edge, and so the probability that a given one such tree-with-extra-edge appears as the restriction to [n] in G(N,p) is asymptotically negligible compared to the probability that the restriction to [n] of G(N,p) is a tree. Naturally, the local limit of components in G(N,c/N) is a Poisson(c) Galton-Watson branching process, and so this is all consistent with the original construction.

One slightly unsatisfying aspect to this construction is that we have to embed the tree of size [n] within a much larger graph on [N] to see uniform trees. We can’t choose a scaling p=p(n) such that G(n,p) itself concentrates on trees. To guarantee connectivity with high probability, we need to take p> \frac{\log n}{n}, but by this threshold, the graph has (many) cycles with high probability.

At this PIMS summer school in Vancouver, one of the courses is focusing on lattice spin models, including the random cluster model, which we now briefly define. We start with some underlying graph G. From a physical motivation, we might take G to be \mathbb{Z}^d or some finite subset of it, or a d-ary tree, or the complete graph K_N. As in classical bond percolation (note G(N,p) is bond percolation on K_N), a random subset of the edges of G are included, or declared open. The probability of a given configuration w, with e open edges is proportional to

p^e (1-p)^{|E(G)| - e} q^{k(w)}, (*)

where the edge-weight p\in(0,1) as usual, and cluster weight q\in (0,\infty), and k(w) counts the number of connected components in configuration w. When q=1, we recover classical bond percolation (including G(N,p) ), while for q>1, this cluster-reweighting favours having more components, and q<1 favours fewer components. Note that in the case q\ne 1, the normalising constant (or partition function) of (*) is generally intractable to calculate explicitly.

As in the Erdos-Renyi graph, consider fixing the underlying graph G, and taking p\rightarrow 0, but also taking \frac{q}{p}\rightarrow 0. So the resulting graph asymptotically ‘wants to have as few edges as possible, but really wants to have as few components as possible’. In particular, 1) all spanning trees of G are equally likely; 2) any configuration with more than one component has asymptotically negligible probability relative to any tree; 3) any graph with a cycle has #components + #edges greater than that of a tree, and so is asymptotically negligible probability relative to any tree.

In other words, the limit of the distribution is the uniform spanning tree of G, and so this (like Aldous-Broder) is a substantial generalisation, which constructs the uniform random tree in the special case where G=K_n.

 

Enumerating Forests

I’ve just got back from a visit to Budapest University of Technology, where it was very pleasant to be invited to give a talk, as well as continuing the discussion our research programme with Balazs. My talk concerned a limit for the exploration process of an Erdos-Renyi random graph conditioned to have no cycles. Watch this space (hopefully very soon) for a fully rigorous account of this. In any case, my timings were not as slick as I would like, and I had to miss out a chunk I’d planned to say about a result of Britikov concerning enumerating unrooted forests. It therefore feels like an excellent time to write something again, and explain this paper, which you might be able to find here, if you have appropriate journal rights.

We are interested to calculate a_{n,m} the number of forests with vertex set [n] consisting of m unrooted trees. Recall that if we were interested in rooted trees, we could appeal to Prufer codes to show that there are m n^{n-m-1} such forests, and indeed results of Pitman give a coalescent/fragmentation scheme as m varies between 1 and n-1. It seems that there is no neat combinatorial re-interpretation of the unrooted case though, so Britikov uses an analytic method.

We know that

a_{n,m}= \frac{n!}{m!} \sum_{\substack{k_1+\ldots+k_m=n\\ k_i\ge 1}} \prod_{j=1}^m \frac{k_j^{k_j-2}}{k_j!}.

To see this, observe that the k_js correspond to the sizes of the m trees in the forest; \frac{n!}{\prod k_j!} gives the multinomial number of ways to assign vertices to the trees; given the labels for a tree of size k_j, there are k_j^{k_j-2} ways to make up the tree itself; and \frac{1}{m!} accounts for the fact that the trees have no order.

What we would really like to do is to take the uniform distribution on the set of all labelled trees, then simulate m IID copies of this distribution, and condition the union to contain precisely n vertices. But obviously this is an infinite set, so we cannot choose uniformly from it. Instead, we can tilt so that large trees are unlikely. In particular, for each x we define

\mathbb{P}(\xi=k) \propto \frac{k^{k-2} x^k}{k!},

and define the normalising constant

B(x):= \sum_{k\ge 1} \frac{k^{k-2}x^k}{k!},

whenever it exists. It turns out that x\le e^{-1} is precisely the condition for B(x)<\infty. Note now that if \xi_1,x_2,\ldots are IID copies of \xi, then

\mathbb{P}(\xi_1+\ldots+\xi_m=n) = \frac{x^n}{B(x)^m} \sum_{k_1+\ldots + k_m=n} \prod_{j=1}^m \frac{k_j^{k_j-2}}{k_j!},

and so we obtain

a_{n,m}= \frac{n!}{m!} \frac{B(x)^m}{x^n} \mathbb{P}(\xi_1+\ldots + \xi_m=n).

So asymptotics for a_{n,m} might follows from laws of large numbers of this distribution \xi.

So far, we haven’t said anything about how to choose this value x. But observe that if you want to have lots of trees in the forest, then the individual trees should generally be small, so we take x small to tilt away from a preference for large trees. It turns out that there is a similar interpretation of criticality for forests as for general graphs, and taking x equal to 1/e, its radius of convergence works well for this setting. If you want even fewer trees, there is no option to take x larger than 1/e, but instead one can use large deviations machinery rather than laws of large number asymptotics.

We will be interested in asymptotics of the characteristic function of \xi for x=1/e. In particular \mathbb{E}[e^{it\xi}]=\frac{B(xe^{it})}{B(x)}, and it will be enough to clarify the behaviour of this as t\rightarrow 0. It’s easier to work with a relation analytic function

\theta(x)=\sum_{k\ge 1} \frac{k^{k-1}x^k}{k!},

ie the integral of B. What now feels like a long time ago I wrote a masters’ thesis on the subject of multiplicative coalescence, and this shows up as the generating function of the solutions to Smoluchowski’s equations with monodisperse initial conditions, which are themselves closely related to the Borel distributions. In any case, several of the early papers on this topic made progress by establishing that the radius of convergence is 1/e, and that \theta(x)e^{-\theta(x)}=x everywhere where |x|\le 1/e. We want to consider x=1/e, for which \theta=1.

Note that \mathbb{E}\xi = \frac{\theta(x)}{B(x)}, so we will make progress by relating B(x),\theta(x) in two ways. One way involves playing around with contour integrals in a fashion that is clear in print, but involves quite a lot of notation. The second way is the Renyi relation which asserts that \theta(x)=B(x)+\frac{\theta(x)^2}{2}. We will briefly give a combinatorial proof. Observe that after multiplying through by factorials and interpreting the square of a generating function, this is equivalent to

k^{k-1} = k^{k-2} + \frac12 \sum_{\substack{l+m=k\\l,m\ge 1}} l^{l-1}m^{m-1}\binom{k}{l},

for all k. As we might expect from the appearance of this equality, we can prove it using a bijection on trees. Obviously on the LHS we have the size of the set of rooted trees on [k]. Now consider the set of pairs of disjoint rooted trees with vertex set [k]. This second term on the RHS is clearly the size of this set. Given an element of this set, join up the two roots, and choose whichever root was not initially in the same tree as 1 to be the new root. We claim this gives a bijection between this set, and the set of rooted trees on [k], for which 1 is not the root. Given the latter, the only pair of trees that leads to the right rooted tree on [k] under this mapping is given by cutting off the unique edge incident to the root that separates the root and vertex 1. In particular, since there is a canonical bijection between rooted trees for which 1 is the root, and unrooted trees (!), we can conclude the Renyi relation.

The Renyi relation now gives \mathbb{E}\xi = \frac{\theta(x)}{B(x)}=2 when x=1/e. If we wanted, we could show that the variance is infinite, which is not completely surprising, as the parameter x lies on the radius of convergence of the generating function.

Now, playing around with contour integrals, and being careful about which strands to take leads to the asymptotic as t\rightarrow 0

\mathbb{E}[ e^{it\xi}] = 1+2it + \frac{2}{3}i |2t|^{3/2} (i\mathrm{sign}(t))^{3/2} + o(|t|^{3/2}).

So from this, we can show that the characteristic function of the rescaled centred partial sum \frac{\xi_1+\ldots+\xi_N-2N}{bN^{2/3}} converges to \exp(-|t|^{3/2}\exp(\frac{i\pi}{4}\mathrm{sign} t)), where b= (32/9)^{1/3} is a constant arising out of the previous step.

We recognise this as the characteristic function of the stable distribution with parameters 3/2 and -1. In particular, we know now that \xi is in the domain of attraction for a stable-3/2 distribution. If we wanted a version of the central limit theorem for such partial sums, we could have that, but since we care about the partial sums of the \xi_is taking a specific value, rather than a range of values on the scale of the fluctuations, we actually need a local limit theorem.

To make this clear, let’s return to the simplest example of the CLT, with some random variables with mean \mu and variance \sigma^2<\infty. Then the partial sums satisfy

\mathbb{P}(\mu N + a\sigma\sqrt{N} \le S_N \le \mu_N+b\sigma\sqrt{N}) \rightarrow \int_a^b f_{\mathcal N}(x)dx,

as N\rightarrow\infty. But what about the probability of S_N taking a particular value m that lies between \mu N+a\sigma \sqrt{N} and \mu N + b\sigma \sqrt{N}? If the underlying distribution was continuous, this would be uncontroversial – considering the probability of lying in a range that is smaller than the scale of the CLT can be shown in a similar way to the CLT itself. A local limit theorem asserts that when the underlying distribution is supported on some lattice, mostly naturally the integers, then these probabilities are in the limit roughly the same whenever m is close to \mu N+a\sigma\sqrt{N}.

In this setting, a result of Ibragimov and Linnik that I have struggled to find anywhere in print (especially in English) gives us local limit theory for integer-supported distributions in the domain of attraction of a stable distribution. Taking p( ) to be the density of this distribution, we obtain

bm^{2/3}\mathbb{P}(\xi_1+\ldots+\xi_m=n) - p(\frac{n-2m}{b m^{2/3}}) \rightarrow 0

as n\rightarrow\infty, uniformly on any set of m for which z= \frac{n-2m}{bm^{2/3}} is bounded. Conveniently, the two occurrences of b clear, and Britikov obtains

a_{n,m} = (1+o(1)) \frac{\sqrt{2\pi} n^{n-1/6}}{2^{n-m}(n-m)!} p(\frac{n-2m}{n^{2/3}},

uniformly in the same sense as before.